Oleg Vidov (1943 - 2017)

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Oleg Vidov (Todd Williamson / Getty)
Oleg Vidov, a Russian-born U.S. actor known best for the films "Waterloo," "Moscow, My Love," and "The Headless Horseman," died Monday, May 15, 2017, of cancer in Westlake Village, California, according to multiple news sources. He was 73.

Vidov, who was born June 11, 1943, in Moscow, grew up in Mongolia, East Germany, and China, as his parents, who worked for the Russian government, moved around a lot on assignment.

Vidov defected from the Soviet Union, immigrating to the United States in 1985. He played roles in films and on television series including "Red Heat," "Wild Orchid," "Love Affair," "Three Days in August," and "The West Wing."

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In 1988, he and his second wife, Joan Borsten, a former actress from Yugoslavia, started a company that restores and distributes Russian animation films. In 2007, the couple co-founded a center in Malibu, California, for helping drug and alcohol addicts to recover.

"My parents were also helping people their whole lives, and my aunt in Kazakhstan helped refugees that were running from the Nazis," Oleg Vidov said in an interview published in 2013 on the Malibu Beach Recovery Center's website. "Times were difficult, and she taught them how to survive. ... So when I came to the U.S., it was natural for me to try and help people. When Joan first talked about opening the clinic, I knew that we should do it."

The couple sold the center in 2014.

Vidov is survived by his wife, Joan Borsten Vidov; two sons, Viacheslav and Sergei; and a grandson.

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